Sat. Nov 26th, 2022

Professional long-distance runner Camille Herron ran an unprecedented 100 miles, but later learned that it wasn’t a world record.

Herron is widely regarded as one of the best ultra runners in the world. He won the 100-mile Jackpot Ultra Running Festival in Nevada in February.

The race was announced as the USA Track and Field 100 Mile Road Championships.

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US long-distance runner Camille Herron reacts after winning the 89km Comrades Marathon between Durban and Pietermaritzburg in South Africa on June 4, 2017, in Pietermaritzburg.  The annual ultramarathon has attracted more than 17,000 runners from around the world.

US long-distance runner Camille Herron reacts after winning the 89km Comrades Marathon between Durban and Pietermaritzburg in South Africa on June 4, 2017, in Pietermaritzburg. The annual ultramarathon has attracted more than 17,000 runners from around the world.

Herron lasted 12 hours 41 minutes 11 seconds and beat Arlen Glick, who finished in second place, by nearly 30 minutes. At 12 hours, 42 minutes and 40 seconds, he broke his own record, or at least he predicted.

The course was re-measured twice, and officials ultimately decided that the course had been shortened by 716 feet. The change meant that the US Track and Field committee would not approve Herron’s record.

Both Herron and his coach, Conor Holt, said they were skeptical of the findings due to the lack of transparency of track and field officials. According to a letter received by The Washington Post, race director Ken Rubeli has questioned the legitimacy of the findings.

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The 40-year-old runner said the situation was devastating.

“I set a world record in that race, and now they’re telling us we don’t know if the course is 100 miles,” he said. “So the last few months have been very upsetting for me. I’ve had races since then and it was very heavy for me and affected my performances.”

U.S. Athletics official David Katz claimed in a statement that the measurements “produced a course of less than 100 miles.”

US long-distance runner Camille Herron reacts after winning the 89km Comrades Marathon between Durban and Pietermaritzburg in South Africa on June 4, 2017, in Pietermaritzburg.  The annual ultramarathon has attracted more than 17,000 runners from around the world.

US long-distance runner Camille Herron reacts after winning the 89km Comrades Marathon between Durban and Pietermaritzburg in South Africa on June 4, 2017, in Pietermaritzburg. The annual ultramarathon has attracted more than 17,000 runners from around the world.
(Photo via RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP Getty Images)

Katz continued by noting that the course was measured twice in February, and then re-measured in October by two “best A-level meters”, running 716 feet short.

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Rubeli expressed his feelings about the measurements in a letter to Nancy Hobbs, chair of the USATF Mountain, Ultra and Trail Sports Council.

“Trying to measure the shortest possible route of a course 8 months after the race is challenging at best and open to subjectivity, especially if the measurers don’t know how green track paint markings relate to cone placement,” Rubeli wrote.

US long-distance runner Camille Herron reacts after winning the 89km Comrades Marathon between Durban and Pietermaritzburg in South Africa on June 4, 2017, in Pietermaritzburg.  The annual ultramarathon has attracted more than 17,000 runners from around the world.

US long-distance runner Camille Herron reacts after winning the 89km Comrades Marathon between Durban and Pietermaritzburg in South Africa on June 4, 2017, in Pietermaritzburg. The annual ultramarathon has attracted more than 17,000 runners from around the world.
(Photo by JAJESH JANTILAL/AFP via Getty Images)

Rubeli also cited safety reasons when talking about changing a turn on the course.

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Herron said he was confident he had run the full 100 miles and wanted another chance at the record.

“I hope I have another opportunity on record, but I may not – you don’t know what the future will bring,” he said. “So that has a huge impact on me and my career. I mean, I’m 40, you know. It’s time for me to be in the best shape of my life. And I mean, these moments I put my heart and soul into that performance and it’s a huge thing to count for sport and sport history. it happened.”