Thu. Dec 1st, 2022

Hello! I’m Youts, a member of the joint game development company Geography of Robots.

We have released our first game Norco in March, and we’re bringing it to consoles now with our publisher Raw Fury. The game is an adventure first-person shooter in the style of classics such as kidnapper, Rise of the dragonas well as deja vu. You play as Kay, a temporary young woman who has returned to her hometown of Norco, Louisiana after her mother’s death, only to discover that her brother has gone missing. In this narrative, the player explores a supernatural and surreal depiction of South Louisiana filled with deranged moat prophets, powerful cults, distributed flesh AI, and other visions of an alternate present. We were surprised and extremely appreciative of the reception the game received, winning the first ever Tribeca Games award in 2021, as well as the Long Film award at the A Maze Festival in Berlin.

Screenshot

The game began as an informal geographic project after Hurricane Katrina. A close friend and I traveled around South Louisiana taking pictures and interviewing to understand how the storm affected our home. I’m from Norco, so I’ve been especially focused on both the city and the adjacent “River Parish” area. We ran this project from about 2007 to 2010. From that point on, I started experimenting with open source online libraries, learning pixel art and the basics of game design. I used this to prototype a side-scroller based on the observations and research we gathered. During this period, I started collaborating with sound artist “Gewgawly I” and the project quickly grew.

BACKYARD

Around 2020, after signing with Raw Fury, Aaron Gray joined us to help port the game from the JavaScript library to Unity. Incredible traditional artist Jesse Jacobi joined our team next year to help with pixel art. By the time the game launched in March, we had a small team and a supportive community. Over the past few months, we have been adding features to the game that improve the quality of life. These include combat bypass; “expert mode” for players who want more difficult puzzles; custom fonts; and gamepad support, which we really hope console players will find comfortable and intuitive.

Norco available right now with Game Pass on Xbox Series X|S, Xbox One, and PC. Hope you enjoy!

refueling

NORCO

Xbox Live

NORCO

Raw Fury


twenty


$14.99

$11.99

PC Game Pass

Xbox Game Pass

NORCO is a point-and-click text-based adventure game that immerses the player in the sinking suburbs and industrial swamps of an increasingly surreal and distorted South Louisiana. Your brother Blake went missing after your mother’s death. In hopes of finding him, you must follow a fugitive security android through the refineries, malls, and drainage ditches of suburban New Orleans. Immerse yourself in the surreal and supernatural of South Louisiana: NORCO’s scenic and cinematic pixel art draws the player into an everyday sci-fi world of disappearing swamps, oil refinery labyrinths, and other landscapes inspired by the titular city of Norco, Louisiana, and other parts of Greater New Orleans. Immerse yourself in rich field recordings and sound design from fmAura and a driving post-industrial electronic soundtrack from Gewgawly I. Unravel the mystery of a world haunted by the past and threatening the future: what starts as a simple search for your missing brother quickly turns into a generational mystery. The boundaries between salvation, memory, technology and nature come together in a uniquely immersive, contemplative storytelling inspired by Southern literature, pulp fiction and point-and-click adventure games, both classic and contemporary. Explore with well-drawn characters with deep roots, rich backstories and complex motifs: a chaotic pirate from the bay, a private detective from a bar, an android security escapee, and your plush baby monkey all offer help in a collapsing and uncertain world. Solve puzzles, fight your way through corporate security thugs, and infiltrate a cult of bosses based in an abandoned mall on the outskirts of New Orleans.”